Why why why

This exercise is used to uncover underlying problems, and to create tension between ‘what is’ and ‘what could be’ - or between hopes and fears.
How, how, how? YYY?

Normally each participant defines her/his focus and is then coached by one or two other participants. The main role of the coaches is to listen carefully to the replies to their questions, and to adapt subsequent questions accordingly.


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About
What is Why why why?

This exercise is used to uncover underlying problems, and to create tension between ‘what is’ and ‘what could be’ - or between hopes and fears. Normally each participant defines her/his focus and is then coached by one or two other participants. The main role of the coaches is to listen carefully to the replies to their questions, and to adapt subsequent questions accordingly.

When is Why why why used?

I first encountered it in a workshop at the Findhorn Foundation in the mid 1980s and have since used widely and incorporated into the Learning for Change methodology.
The Learning for Change booklet (link below) was prepared by Marilyn Mehlmann and André Benaim, with the support of Shepherd Urenje and Frans Lenglet, and many workshop participants in Europe, Africa and Asia. / Marilyn Mehlmann

The later Theory U methodology seems to have similar provenance.

Categories
  • Awareness Raising
  • Collective Intelligence
  • Decision making
  • Empowerment
  • Idea generator
  • Integration of input into daily life
  • Peer coaching
  • Problem Solving
  • Reflection
Innovation Phases
  • 3 Fostering New Perspectives & Ways of Thinking
Train the Trainer seminars including Why why why can be found here: